Jenny Morgan

Artist living and working in New York City.
“Jenny Morgan: How To Find A Ghost” has been listed as a Top 100 Fall Show Worldwide by Modern Painters.
Opens Oct. 17th at Driscoll Babcock Galleries, NYC.

“Jenny Morgan: How To Find A Ghost” has been listed as a Top 100 Fall Show Worldwide by Modern Painters.

Opens Oct. 17th at Driscoll Babcock Galleries, NYC.

ocean-flaws-deactivated20131129 asked: how where you able to achieve such neat thin brush strokes for hair? i'm finding it impossible with oil paint :(

I use a long, thin synthetic bristle brush- I even take a razor blade and cut it’s thickness in half. The most important aspect is using super thin paint- I thin mine down simply using terpeniod. The paint needs to be thin and light and the brush full in order to pull a long line across the canvas. 

Hope that helps- it all just takes some practice:)

jenny

EXHIBITION ANNOUNCEMENT:"Contained Conflict," July 11 - August 10, 2013
Driscoll Babcock Galleries 525 W 25th street NYC
Opening Reception: Thursday, July 11, 6-8PM
Featuring works by: Doug Argue, Harriet Bart, Bahar Behbahani, Wafaa Bilal, Ross Bleckner, Margaret Bowland, Marylyn Dintenfass, Pieter Hugo, Paulo Laport, Robert Longo, Jenny Morgan, MR, Patricia Piccinini & Varda Yatom

EXHIBITION ANNOUNCEMENT:
"Contained Conflict," July 11 - August 10, 2013

Driscoll Babcock Galleries 525 W 25th street NYC

Opening Reception: Thursday, July 11, 6-8PM


Featuring works by: Doug Argue, Harriet Bart, Bahar Behbahani, Wafaa Bilal, Ross Bleckner, Margaret Bowland, Marylyn Dintenfass, Pieter Hugo, Paulo Laport, Robert Longo, Jenny Morgan, MR, Patricia Piccinini & Varda Yatom

Save the date…

Save the date…

cixeled asked: I'm stuck in a rut in college where my mental ambition exceeds what I can actually create. How do you deal with that compromise?

 I am still dealing with it. If you’re lucky, your imagination and mental imagery will always be one or two steps ahead of you- we strive towards perfect execution and that is the key to a long and rewarding relationship with your work. My best advice is to just keep exploring and making work- just make make make. Making the work is really the only way. In the process you will find your natural strengths/style and your mental imagery will start to transform and reflect your personal voice. AND a rut just means you’re about to transition to a new level. In the mean time, do some meditating, working out and talking art with fellow students. The ideas will start to flow again and your hand will catch up.

Visiting Artists Jenny Morgan and David Mramor will give a lecture at Mitchell Auditorium, Seigfred Hall 5th Floor, 5PM, Monday, March 11th.

Visiting Artists Jenny Morgan and David Mramor will give a lecture at Mitchell Auditorium, Seigfred Hall 5th Floor, 5PM, Monday, March 11th.

HARD-BOILED WONDERLAND AND THE END OF THE WORLD
January 8 - February 2, 2013Curated by Gregg LouisNatalia AriasHeather CoxPeter DeanJuan DowneyBarry FlanaganYuhi HasegawaGregg LouisRoberto MattaDuane MichalsIrvin MorazanJenny MorganTakashi MurakamiPieralli)(FaviNiki De Saint Phalle & Jean TinguelyHugo TillmanNohra Haime Gallery is pleased to present Hard- Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, a group exhibition curated by Gregg Louis, running from January 8th through February 2nd, 2013. An opening reception will be held on Tuesday, January 8th from 6 to 8pm.Drawing its title from a novel by Haruki Murakami, the exhibition explores a wide range of concepts including dreams, spirituality, and the unconscious mind. Featuring works by more than 15 emerging and internationally renowned artists, the collected works twist and turn through a surreal landscape of dualities: internal and external, conscious and unconscious, spiritual and physical. When these dynamic forces intersect the result is a vaguely familiar dream-like world.Hard-boiled Wonderland is a familiar journey through a strange place, much like the one Murakami described back in 1985.DATES: January 8 - February 2, 2013OPENING RECEPTION: Tuesday, January 8 from 6 to 8 p.m.FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ana Maria de la Ossa at 212-888-3550 or gallery@nohrahaimegallery.com

HARD-BOILED WONDERLAND AND THE END OF THE WORLD

January 8 - February 2, 2013
Curated by Gregg Louis

Natalia Arias
Heather Cox
Peter Dean
Juan Downey
Barry Flanagan
Yuhi Hasegawa
Gregg Louis
Roberto Matta
Duane Michals
Irvin Morazan
Jenny Morgan
Takashi Murakami
Pieralli)(Favi
Niki De Saint Phalle & Jean Tinguely
Hugo Tillman

Nohra Haime Gallery is pleased to present Hard- Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, a group exhibition curated by Gregg Louis, running from January 8th through February 2nd, 2013. An opening reception will be held on Tuesday, January 8th from 6 to 8pm.

Drawing its title from a novel by Haruki Murakami, the exhibition explores a wide range of concepts including dreams, spirituality, and the unconscious mind. Featuring works by more than 15 emerging and internationally renowned artists, the collected works twist and turn through a surreal landscape of dualities: internal and external, conscious and unconscious, spiritual and physical. When these dynamic forces intersect the result is a vaguely familiar dream-like world.

Hard-boiled Wonderland is a familiar journey through a strange place, much like the one Murakami described back in 1985.

DATES: January 8 - February 2, 2013

OPENING RECEPTION: Tuesday, January 8 from 6 to 8 p.m.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ana Maria de la Ossa at 212-888-3550 or gallery@nohrahaimegallery.com

idontgamble asked: Your work is amazing! I'd be really happy to find your book here in Brazil!

Thank you:) You can get the books online here-

www.blurb.com

xo

Jenny Morgan and David Mramor Collaboration
"The Hunted"
8 x 8
2009

Jenny Morgan and David Mramor Collaboration

"The Hunted"

8 x 8

2009

New location of Driscoll Babcock Galleries now open in Chelsea.
525 W 25th street.

New location of Driscoll Babcock Galleries now open in Chelsea.

525 W 25th street.

I’m happy to invite you to Driscoll Babcock Galleries group show, “This Is How We Do It.”  The gallery will be showcasing their unique take on pairing the old with the new.  We will also be celebrating their big move to the new Chelsea space and my first show with the gallery as a represented artist. 

It’s the start of a new art world season, so I hope to see you out and about on the 13th:)


"This Is How We Do It"
Opening Reception September 13th 6-8 PM
Driscoll Babcock Galleries
525 W 25th Street 
New York, NY
I’m happy to invite you to Driscoll Babcock Galleries group show, “This Is How We Do It.”  The gallery will be showcasing their unique take on pairing the old with the new.  We will also be celebrating their big move to the new Chelsea space and my first show with the gallery as a represented artist. 
It’s the start of a new art world season, so I hope to see you out and about on the 13th:)
"This Is How We Do It"
Opening Reception September 13th 6-8 PM
Driscoll Babcock Galleries
525 W 25th Street 
New York, NY
I’ll be participating in GO open studios this weekend. I would love to have visitors, so please stop by. The hours are 11AM-7PM Sat and Sun, though I do have to close up around 4 on Sunday for another commitment. Hope to see you there.

Yay Brooklyn:)

I’ll be participating in GO open studios this weekend. I would love to have visitors, so please stop by. The hours are 11AM-7PM Sat and Sun, though I do have to close up around 4 on Sunday for another commitment. Hope to see you there.

Yay Brooklyn:)

UPDATE.I can finally break the news about my new representation- I am excited to be working with Driscoll Babcock Galleries! The gallery is making a big move from the upper east side and is building out a new space on 25th st in Chelsea. It’s a new world and new adventures and I thank all of my friends and colleagues for the love and support along the way.Read more about gallery’s transformation in the Wall Street Journal- here is the full article:)
The Wall Street JournalAugust 10, 2012Venerable Gallery In Modern MoveBy JENNIFER MALONEYNew York’s oldest art gallery is synonymous with the staid back rooms of Midtown art dealers, where the works of Old and New World masters trade hands in quiet, carpeted surroundings.Now, Babcock Galleries is moving to Chelsea.The space at 525 W. 25th St. for Driscoll Babcock Galleries.The leap to the heart of the city’s contemporary art scene—a neighborhood with a markedly different aesthetic than Midtown—marks a new era for Babcock. The gallery, which for 160 years has specialized in American artworks, is embracing a new look, a new name and a new expansion—into contemporary and international art. It is also expanding its stable of living artists.Driscoll Babcock Galleries— renamed for its owner, John Driscoll—will open on Sept. 8 at 525 W. 25th St., on a block stacked with such galleries as Pace, Marlborough Chelsea and Nancy Margolis.The owner’s idea: to hang the work of contemporary artists side by side with historic works that explore the same themes."You can’t create this great art in a vacuum," said Mr. Driscoll, 62 years old. "Our interest is in artists who are cognizant of art of the past and recognize its pertinence in their own work today."And so he will move from galleries on Fifth Avenue near East 57th Street—decorated with imported wool carpeting and paint in shades of gray inspired by Cézanne’s Aix-en-Provence studio—to a space with concrete floors, white walls and exposed ducts.It’s quite a change for a place that has kept the same phone number since 1956, and occasionally receives calls from former clients’ great-grandchildren."Someone once said going into Babcock was like going into a white-shoe law firm," Mr. Driscoll said, acknowledging that he will be adding to his collection of edgy eyeglasses.Knoedler & Co., founded in 1846, held the title of New York’s oldest gallery until it closed last year. Babcock Galleries was founded by John Snedecor in 1852—18 years before the founding of the Metropolitan Museum of Art—on Broadway near East Eighth Street. From the beginning, it sought out the works of American masters—the likes of George Inness, John Frederick Kensett, Winslow Homer, Mary Cassatt and Childe Hassam.Snedecor’s Gallery gradually zigzagged uptown, and was renamed Babcock Galleries in 1918.Works that today hang in the Met, the Brooklyn Museum and the National Gallery of Art, among others were sourced by Babcock.Mr. Driscoll bought the gallery in 1987. Although he followed its tradition of acquiring and sourcing American art, his personal interests are much broader. His own collection includes English, Japanese and Danish art, as well as 20th-century ceramics.He had been mulling a move downtown for about seven years. He said he jumped at the chance to lease 4,700 square feet—with the possibility of 2,000 more—in a building owned by Related Co.The gallery owns an unusually large inventory, numbering in the thousands of pieces. Although it has mounted shows and represents estates, it has had only a small stable of living artists. Mr. Driscoll recently signed the Brooklyn painters Jenny Morgan and Margaret Bowland, and said he is in discussions with other artists in the U.S., China and Europe. He will continue his back-office business sourcing works for private collections and museums.Mr. Driscoll will be presenting a distinctly historic perspective in a neighborhood known for cutting-edge art.David Maupin, of Lehmann Maupin Gallery in Chelsea, said the idea is compelling."I think juxtapositions of different periods in our history are always interesting, as long as they are done well," he said. "I look forward to seeing it."Jenny Morgan, a figurative painter, said she left Like the Spice Gallery in Brooklyn to sign with Mr. Driscoll last month."There’s a lot of knowledge and experience behind him," she said. "It’s really exciting."Ms. Morgan, who said she draws inspiration from the masters and as well as contemporary portrait painters, said of her decision to join the new venture: “Honestly, it was just instinct. It felt correct.”Walking through his new space, which is still under renovation, Mr. Driscoll described a glass wall that will enclose the gallery’s archives, which go back 150 years.The design for the main gallery includes LED lights and a metal mesh ceiling, only partially obscuring the “spaghetti” of pipes and ducts above, he said.And he will keep the phone number from 1956. “Every time that number lights up, we know it’s a phone call from another dimension,” he said.

image- Andrew Hinderaker for The Wall Street Journal
Gallery owner John Driscoll in what will be his new showroom.

UPDATE.
I can finally break the news about my new representation- I am excited to be working with Driscoll Babcock Galleries! The gallery is making a big move from the upper east side and is building out a new space on 25th st in Chelsea. It’s a new world and new adventures and I thank all of my friends and colleagues for the love and support along the way.

Read more about gallery’s transformatio
n in the Wall Street Journal- here is the full article:)


The Wall Street Journal
August 10, 2012
Venerable Gallery In Modern Move
By JENNIFER MALONEY

New York’s oldest art gallery is synonymous with the staid back rooms of Midtown art dealers, where the works of Old and New World masters trade hands in quiet, carpeted surroundings.

Now, Babcock Galleries is moving to Chelsea.


The space at 525 W. 25th St. for Driscoll Babcock Galleries.

The leap to the heart of the city’s contemporary art scene—a neighborhood with a markedly different aesthetic than Midtown—marks a new era for Babcock. The gallery, which for 160 years has specialized in American artworks, is embracing a new look, a new name and a new expansion—into contemporary and international art. It is also expanding its stable of living artists.

Driscoll Babcock Galleries— renamed for its owner, John Driscoll—will open on Sept. 8 at 525 W. 25th St., on a block stacked with such galleries as Pace, Marlborough Chelsea and Nancy Margolis.

The owner’s idea: to hang the work of contemporary artists side by side with historic works that explore the same themes.

"You can’t create this great art in a vacuum," said Mr. Driscoll, 62 years old. "Our interest is in artists who are cognizant of art of the past and recognize its pertinence in their own work today."

And so he will move from galleries on Fifth Avenue near East 57th Street—decorated with imported wool carpeting and paint in shades of gray inspired by Cézanne’s Aix-en-Provence studio—to a space with concrete floors, white walls and exposed ducts.

It’s quite a change for a place that has kept the same phone number since 1956, and occasionally receives calls from former clients’ great-grandchildren.

"Someone once said going into Babcock was like going into a white-shoe law firm," Mr. Driscoll said, acknowledging that he will be adding to his collection of edgy eyeglasses.

Knoedler & Co., founded in 1846, held the title of New York’s oldest gallery until it closed last year. Babcock Galleries was founded by John Snedecor in 1852—18 years before the founding of the Metropolitan Museum of Art—on Broadway near East Eighth Street. From the beginning, it sought out the works of American masters—the likes of George Inness, John Frederick Kensett, Winslow Homer, Mary Cassatt and Childe Hassam.


Snedecor’s Gallery gradually zigzagged uptown, and was renamed Babcock Galleries in 1918.

Works that today hang in the Met, the Brooklyn Museum and the National Gallery of Art, among others were sourced by Babcock.

Mr. Driscoll bought the gallery in 1987. Although he followed its tradition of acquiring and sourcing American art, his personal interests are much broader. His own collection includes English, Japanese and Danish art, as well as 20th-century ceramics.

He had been mulling a move downtown for about seven years. He said he jumped at the chance to lease 4,700 square feet—with the possibility of 2,000 more—in a building owned by Related Co.

The gallery owns an unusually large inventory, numbering in the thousands of pieces. Although it has mounted shows and represents estates, it has had only a small stable of living artists. Mr. Driscoll recently signed the Brooklyn painters Jenny Morgan and Margaret Bowland, and said he is in discussions with other artists in the U.S., China and Europe. He will continue his back-office business sourcing works for private collections and museums.

Mr. Driscoll will be presenting a distinctly historic perspective in a neighborhood known for cutting-edge art.

David Maupin, of Lehmann Maupin Gallery in Chelsea, said the idea is compelling.

"I think juxtapositions of different periods in our history are always interesting, as long as they are done well," he said. "I look forward to seeing it."

Jenny Morgan, a figurative painter, said she left Like the Spice Gallery in Brooklyn to sign with Mr. Driscoll last month.

"There’s a lot of knowledge and experience behind him," she said. "It’s really exciting."

Ms. Morgan, who said she draws inspiration from the masters and as well as contemporary portrait painters, said of her decision to join the new venture: “Honestly, it was just instinct. It felt correct.”

Walking through his new space, which is still under renovation, Mr. Driscoll described a glass wall that will enclose the gallery’s archives, which go back 150 years.

The design for the main gallery includes LED lights and a metal mesh ceiling, only partially obscuring the “spaghetti” of pipes and ducts above, he said.

And he will keep the phone number from 1956. “Every time that number lights up, we know it’s a phone call from another dimension,” he said.
image- Andrew Hinderaker for The Wall Street Journal

Gallery owner John Driscoll in what will be his new showroom.